The world of wine has re-opened with a vengeance

The world of wine has re-opened with a vengeance

It’s pretty easy to stick to what you know and like with wine, often for very sensible reasons too. We get that wine labels can be confusing and each new bottle represents as much of a risk as it does a discovery. But the wine world has a chameleon-like nature and loves to change and re-invent itself with new styles of wine so that there’s always something enticing on offer. Nowhere is this more apparent than at ProWein, the vast global wine industry trade show held in Düsseldorf, Germany. Vast is an understatement too - the trade halls housing ProWein cover an area larger then most New Zealand small towns, to display wines from every corner of the world, with every wine style that’s made open to try. What was fascinating this year is how classic European regions are re-inventing themselves - I tasted Mosel Riesling fermented in 100% new French oak, un-sulphured red Bordeaux, amphora-fermented skin contact Moscatel from Setúbal in Portugal, and aged Brut zero Champagne. None of these used to exist a decade ago except for the Champagne, and even then Brut zero was a comparative rarity. But now…..tasting several un-sulphured Bordeaux in a day almost seemed normal. Here at Cellar, all of these wines are on our radar for the future, alongside the many great and more-conventional wines discovered from around the world too: Pošip from Croatia, old bush vine Grenache from South Africa, and ripe Carmenère from Chile. It’s a reminder that theand producers around the world don’t appear to be resting on their laurels. For us as wine drinkers, what could this mean? More wines with real personality, character and story are going to be available in the future, and that’s going to be really exciting to line up alongside the classics that we all know and love.